Remarks With Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi

Remarks
John Kerry
Secretary of State
Beijing, China
May 16, 2015


STATE COUNCILOR YANG: (Via interpreter) Secretary Kerry and the colleagues from the U.S. side, firstly, I would like to extend a warm welcome to all of you to China, especially to Secretary Kerry. Secretary Kerry, over the past two years and more since you took office as the Secretary of State, you have visit China five times. This fully testifies to the value you place on the China-U.S. relationship, and we would like to express our appreciation for your effort.

Thanks to the joint efforts of both sides, new ground has been covered in our development to establish a new model of major country relationship between China and the United States. Right now, we enjoy frequent high-level visits, and we are also witnessing steady progress in our practical cooperation in the various fields, in particular in the economic field. We have carried out productive coordination and cooperation on tackling global challenges such as terrorism, the fight against the Ebola epidemic, climate change, as well as on other hotspot issues.

In September this year, President Xi will be paying a state visit to the United States upon the invitation of President Obama. This is an issue of paramount importance in our bilateral relationship. Both sides should focus on the preparation for this visit, and while we do so, we also strengthen our strategic communication, deepen our strategic mutual trust and cooperation, and in this way, will make sure that China-U.S. relationship will always press ahead on the right track of being a new model of major country relationship between us. Thank you.

SECRETARY KERRY: Well, thank you. Is this working? Yeah.

STATE COUNCILOR YANG: Yeah.

SECRETARY KERRY: Mr. State Councilor, my friend Yang Jiechi, thank you for your welcome. And indeed, I think we have made enormous progress in strengthening the day-to-day cooperation between our countries. As I have said many times, this is one of the most consequential relationships in the world. Our cooperation on Ebola, on Iran’s nuclear program, on counterterrorism, on Afghanistan, on so many different issues, is building. And now we have three very important meetings coming at us: the meeting of ourselves at the Security and Economic Dialogue that will take place in Washington in about a month, or three or four weeks; the meeting of President Xi, which you’ve mentioned, with President Obama at a state visit in September, which we look forward to; and then finally, leading up to the climate change negotiations in Paris. Even probably we should add the various meetings that will take place at the United Nations in September.

So it’s a big agenda, and one of the areas that I think shows the greatest promise for our collaboration is what you and I discussed at my home in Boston when we talked about development cooperation on building health capacity, building power, electricity, energy. So we have great opportunities, and we very much look forward to elaborating on them tonight.

But I think the most important thing we can do tonight, and we don’t need to spend an enormous amount of time on it, is deliberating a bit about the President’s visit (inaudible).