Additional Details on FY 2003 Performance Results - Strategic Goal 7: Democracy and Human Rights

FY 2003 Performance and Accountability Report
Bureau of Resource Management
December 2003
Report

Performance Goal 1: Democratic System and Practices

Initiative/Program #1: Engagement to Advance Democracy

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #1: NUMBER OF COUNTRIES ELIGIBLE FOR COMMUNITY OF DEMOCRACIES (CD) AND IDENTIFIED AS DEMOCRATIC IN OTHER INDICES
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. More countries are eligible for inclusion on invitation list for CD ministerial. 1. More countries become eligible for inclusion on invitation list for CD ministerial. 1. 118 countries invited to participate in 2002 Community of Democracies ministerial meeting (held in FY 2003). Above Target
2. N/A 2. Freedom House Index: Net Progress,
(i.e. + change from previous year). Net Change in Status: + change from previous year.
2. Freedom House 2003 Report (released 4/03) Free: 89; Partly Free: 55; Not Free: 48; improved countries: 29; Declined countries: 11;
Net Progress: +18.
Above Target
3. N/A 3. Country ratings in Human Rights Practices: + change from previous year. 3. 2002 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices (pub. 3/03): Countries w/ Right to Change Governments: 126; Countries w/ Limits: 35; Countries w/o Rights: 34. Net Progress: +6 Citizens of 6 countries gained the right to change their government since the 2001 country reports were issued, including Comoros (new elections), Republic of Congo (new elections), Kenya, Fiji (end of coup), Yugoslavia and Afghanistan. Above Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Target was expanded to increase specificity.
  • Data Reliability: Data is taken from the Community of Democracies invitation list. Freedom House surveys are independent and apply consistent standards and take measure of progress over time, making them reliable guides to the status of freedom abroad. The Human Rights Report gives specific information concerning the right of a country's people to change their government (Section 3 of each report). This is the category of interest that will allow tracking of progress. Three major brackets exist for this category: 1) countries in which people have and can exercise the right to change their government, 2) countries in which people are given the right (constitutionally, for example) but are limited in their ability to exercise it, and 3) countries in which people do not have the right to change their government.
  • Data Validation: Use of multiple indexes allows for comparison and validation. Instruments include internal and independent measures of human rights and democracy progress.
  • Other Issues: The 3rd CD ministerial will be held in Santiago, Chile in FY 2005. No invitation lists will be considered in FY 2003 or 2004. The World Bank Institute is expanding its current good governance analysis to apply more directly to the work of DRL and the measurement of positive impact; this information will not be ready until FY 2004.
PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #2: ACTIVITIES THAT STRENGTHEN THE COMMUNITY OF DEMOCRACIES (CDs)
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
Implement Regional meetings per Seoul Action Plan. CD ministerial produces Plan of Action. Implementation begins, including OAS-NEPAD cooperation and other regional follow-up. Seoul Plan of Action implementation well underway. Regional CD conference for democracy building in Africa and Western Hemisphere, with Organization of African States-African Union (OAS-AU) cooperation, held in June 2003. OSCE meeting to be held in Romania in November 2003; Portugal meeting also planned. On Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Increases specificity of targets.
  • Data Reliability: U.S. participated as host of regional Africa/Western Hemisphere conference and coordinated and monitored CD initiatives.
  • Data Validation: U.S. is member of many of the relevant groupings: the CD itself, OAS, OSCE. Department also cooperates with representatives of NGOs participating in CD-related NGO forums, providing additional validation.

Performance Goal 2: Universal Human Rights Standards

Initiative/Program #2: Bilateral and Multilateral Diplomacy

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #1: NUMBER OF UN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS (UNCHR) RESOLUTIONS ON DEMOCRACY ADOPTED
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
NCHR adopts an increased number (compared to 2002) of country-specific resolutions of the highest interest. Commission adopts a majority of country-specific and thematic resolutions of highest interest. In 2003, CHR passed resolutions on Cuba, North Korea, Belarus (U.S.-sponsored), Turkmenistan, Burma and Iraq. Chechnya, Sudan and Zimbabwe resolutions were defeated. U.S. took strong stand against Libyan chairmanship of CHR. U.S. succeeded in blocking "special sitting" on Iraq, despite strong anti-U.S. bloc among some Muslim countries and some EU states. On Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Target was too conservative.
  • Data Validation: CHR votes are a matter of public record. Other reporting from U.S. missions during the year in the lead-up to the CHR will identify favorable and problematic resolutions, allowing us to chart results of diplomacy before and during the CHR.
PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #2: NUMBER OF UNCHR STATES WITH NEGATIVE HUMAN RIGHTS RECORDS
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
Reduce by 20 percent the number of UNCHR states with negative records. No more than 15 CHR member states with negative record. Sixteen member states with negative records. Slightly Below Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Increased specificity.
  • Data Reliability: CHR membership is a matter of public record. The Human Rights Reports are published by the State Department each year, evaluating individual countries' human rights records. CHR members' voting records also indicate positions on human rights issues of particular concern to the U.S.
  • Data Validation: The Human Rights Reports will be examined to indicate the human rights record of a particular country. Community of Democracies participation also gauges democratic practices and civil rights guarantees. Independent surveys and NGO reports provide additional analysis and also cite problematic members and chairmanship candidates, recognizing the connection between their records and the effectiveness of the CHR.

 

Initiative/Program #3: Apply Human Rights Standards

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #3: AMOUNT AND QUALITY OF POST REPORTING ON
HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS PURSUANT TO LEAHY REQUIREMENTS
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
Reporting procedures formulated and put into place. N/A Database to collect information on human rights abuses in countries receiving security assistance is being developed and tested. On Target

 

Initiative/Program #4: Annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #4: EFFECTIVE USE OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS REPORT (HRR) TO PROMOTE U.S. FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. N/A 1. 2002 HRR length is cut by 15% to the 2001 base, while maintaining high standard. 1. Though length of total HRR was reduced only 10%; 27 pilot countries were selected for editing of text to produce higher readability and more succinct presentation. Praise for the integrity and quality of the report was received from would-be critics, including Human Rights Watch, which said the reports "pulled no punches." On Target
2. Increased number of posts use HRR in public diplomacy. 2. Strategy developed to increase number of posts using HRR for public diplomacy efforts. 2. Translations and other spin-off products for public diplomacy used
worldwide, particularly in Africa and the Middle East.
On Target
3. Choose pilot posts for human-rights-based program implementation plan. 3. Pilot posts chosen for human rights reporting-based HRDF program implementation plan. 3. Human Rights Democracy Fund projects were implemented in several countries in Central Asia and the Middle East in response to issues highlighted in corresponding reports. On Target
4. Develop focus on institutional change in HRR. 4. HRR focus on institutional change is developed. 4. HRR focus on institutional change was not developed. On Target
5. Translate HRR into Chinese and Russian. 5. HRR translated into Chinese and Russian. 5. Full reports or critical portions are translated into Chinese, Russian, Spanish, French, Arabic and Farsi. Over 50 individual posts' reports translated and posted on websites. On Target
6. More posts in Asia, Latin America, and Europe place the appropriate country reports in translated version on their websites. 6. Posts in China, the NIS/Central Asia, Latin America, and Europe post the appropriate country reports on their websites in the appropriate languages. 6. Posts in China, the NIS/Central Asia, Latin America, and Europe posted the appropriate country reports on their websites in the appropriate languages. On Target
7. N/A 7. Human Rights Strategy Report is published and distributed widely to illustrate ways in which U.S. government programs are having an impact worldwide. 7. Human Rights Strategy Report was published in June 2003. Portions translated into host-country, regional and world languages. On Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Increase specificity and incorporate launch of the new (congressionally mandated) human rights strategy report as a program tool.
  • Data Reliability: Translations ordered or requested are monitored for completion; survey of State Department websites (including those of missions abroad) counted number of available translations.
  • Data Validation: High standard monitored internally, by news media, and by independent, internationally respected NGOs such as Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and the Lawyers' Committee on Human Rights, which produce commentaries on the HRR. Translation and web-posting coordinated and canvassed by DRL.

 

Initiative/Program #5: Promote International Religious Freedom

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #5: LEVEL OF ENGAGEMENT WITH FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS AND NGOs TO PROMOTE AND ADVOCATE ON BEHALF OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN KEEPING WITH FOREIGN POLICY DIRECTIVES SUCH AS THE INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT (IRFA)
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. Efforts in Eastern Europe result in more religion laws improved; fewer religious prisioners taken, more released; more inter-faith dialogue; more religious reconciliation programs implemented. 1. More IRF integration into policy and advocacy by senior U.S. officials abroad and executive and legislative branches, including better coordination with Congress. Special focus on Afghanistan and Iraq (both designated CPCs) for increased religious freedom, including through the constitution-drafting processes. 1. IRF concerns have been raised by the Department in bilateral and multilateral meetings. On Target
2. N/A 2. Build coalitions through travel to like-minded countries which will strengthen ties and enlist broader-based advocacy in support of international religious freedom goals. 2. IRF officers have begun engagement on promoting religious freedom in Afghanistan and Iraq. On Target
3. N/A 3. Posts provide consistently high-quality reporting on religious freedom. 3. Posts have shown an increased engagement on IRF issues, producing for the most part excellent country reports for the International Religious Freedom Report to Congress. On Target
4. N/A 4. More IRF advocacy is undertaken by the Department in multilateral forums. 4. The IRF ambassador and officers have been instrumental in facilitating the removal of people persecuted for their faith from harm's way. The Ambassador-at-Large and staff have visited China, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia for repeated trips. On Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: IRF indicators combined into "Quality and quantity of advocacy, monitoring, analysis and reporting by IRF and U.S. embassies abroad. Improved policies in target countries (e.g., constitutional protections, better religion laws, improved registration procedures, fewer religious prisoners, more inter-religious dialogue, less religion-based advocacy of violence)."
  • Data Reliability: The Annual Report on International Religious Freedom covers international religious freedom in countries worldwide and will verify achieved targets. At least one country will be identified as moving forward with IRF legislation/implementation, due to pressure from ally nations, senior U.S. officials and Congress. The Ambassador and/or IRF Office staff will travel several times each to at least three high-priority countries to negotiate and review progress of target IRF goals with foreign government officials. Observations of non-USG sources of information such as the religious press, NGOs and faith-based organizations generally support USG reports of successes.
  • Data Validation: Congress established the broad policy goals and reporting requirements in the International Religious Freedom Act. The performance indicators chosen and verification follow from the mandates of the law. Meetings, agreements and documented movement by the country toward greater IRF are concrete examples of progress toward IRF goals as established by Congress.
  • Partners: We coordinate closely on these issues with the National Security Council, as well as with interested Members and staff in Congress.
PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #6: INTENSITY OF MONITORING, REPORTING, AND ANALYSIS ON BEHALF OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM BY THE USG AND MULTILATERAL INSTITUTIONS IN KEEPING WITH FOREIGN POLICY DIRECTIVES SUCH AS THE INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. IRF reports recognized for high-quality reporting. 1. N/A 1. N/A, see "Other Issues" below. N/A
2. Analysis expanded either in report introduction or in separate op-ed piece for major U.S. newspaper or other widely circulated publication. 2. N/A 2. N/A, see "Other Issues" below. N/A
3. New resolution or conference reporting on IRF or IRF-related issue agreed to by a multilateral institution due to U.S. intervention. 3. N/A 3. N/A, see "Other Issues" below. N/A
Details of 2003 Results
  • Other Issues: Monitoring and advocacy functions are integral, separating the reporting function into a separate indicator divorced input and output from results and outcomes. Work pertaining to this indicator has been subsumed into indicator number five.

 

Initiative/Program #6: Labor Diplomacy and Advocacy for Worker's Rights

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #7: NUMBER OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS TO ADVANCE RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. Conduct in-country VP workshops in Nigeria and Colombia with companies, host governments, and NGOs. Establishment of steering committee to foster continued implementation on the ground. Approach southern tier governments to gauge willingness to join VPs. 1. Develop program to improve work safety and health conditions in China. 1. Programs funded to educate workers on rights and pilot program developed to address labor conditions in select factories in China and in forty-two other countries. Slightly Below Target
2. PESP pilot program developed to integrate worker and manager training to strengthen worker rights. Initiate discussion on harmonization of codes with public and private partners to increase effectiveness of factory compliance monitoring. 2. Worker rights violations decrease in half the countries in which the Department has anti-sweatshop programs. 2. Method to track labor violations not developed. Slightly Below Target
3. N/A 3. The number of overseas factories respecting business codes of conduct increases 20 percent. 3. PESP projects showing progress in Central America. Slightly Below Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: A better description of Department activity.
  • Data Reliability: Data provided by Department.
  • Other Issues: Once a labor violations tracking method is developed, the Department will be able to track progress and more fully report on target two.
PERFORMANCE INDICATOR #8: STATUS OF WORKER RIGHTS
Initial FY 2003 Target Revised Target FY 2003 Result FY 2003 Performance Ratings
1. Increase implementation of ILO labor standards in Muslim countries. Increase in respect for worker rights in China. 1. Worker organizations established in one country in each of the following regions: Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, the Middle East, China, Central America, and Africa. Increase in implementation of International Labor Organization standards in the Muslim world. Increase in respect for workers' rights in China. 1. Significant HRDF and DOL/ILAB projects dealing with worker rights begun in China. Notable improvements in worker rights made in Cambodia. Continuing improvement in Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. For example, nineteen new labor unions were formed in Bahrain after the 2002 adoption of a ground-breaking labor law. Labor "committees" authorized in Saudi Arabia. Key ILO conventions ratified by Syria, Sudan and Lebanon. 1. On Target
2. N/A 2. Include provisions to protect worker rights in the FTA under negotiation with five Central American nations, and in other FTAs and Trade & Investment Facilitation Agreements (TIFAs). 2. Labor clauses in all initial versions of the trade agreements currently under negotiation: the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), other agreements (FTAs) with Morocco, Australia, and the South African Customs Union. 2. On Target
Details of 2003 Results
  • Reason for Target Revision: Sharper regional focus for worker organizations. Labor provisions in free trade agreements added as target.
  • Data Reliability: Embassy reporting and analysis, and appropriately evaluated reporting from national and international NGOs, and intergovernmental organizations such as the ILO.
  • Data Validation: Tracking the existence of independent and democratic worker organizations will measure a given country's respect for basic worker rights. Tracking the effectiveness of the provisions to protect internationally recognized worker rights provides a measure of the ability of the trade agreements and other agreements to contribute to broad-based economic development.
  • Partners: Department of Labor, U.S. Trade Representative.