Strategic Goal 11: Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs - Performance Results for Performance Goal 4

FY 2003 Performance and Accountability Report
Bureau of Resource Management
December 2003
Report

PERFORMANCE GOAL 4

American understanding and support for U.S. foreign policy, development programs, the Department of State, and the U.S. Agency for International Development

 

I/P #4: OUTREACH TO EXPANDED U.S. AUDIENCE

Reach beyond traditional audiences to a younger, broader, and deeper audience.

OUTPUT INDICATOR

Indicator #1: Number of Interviews and Contacts With U S. Media

FY Results History 2000 N/A
2001 N/A
2002 N/A
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results

Baseline:

  • 120 daily press briefings;
  • 15,000 calls from the press;
  • 1,000 print, radio, and TV interviews, Opinion Editorials (Op Eds) and major press conferences with Department principals.
Target 16,000 contacts/year.
Rating On Target
Impact Daily press briefings and responses to calls provide journalists with accurate, authoritative statements of U.S. policy. Op-Eds, press conferences and interviews with Department officials help explain Administration views to the broadest possible audience.

OUTPUT INDICATOR

Indicator #2: Increase in the Number of Outreach Activities to Targeted U.S. Audiences

FY Results History 2000 N/A
2001 N/A
2002 N/A
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results

Baseline:

  • Distributed 14,000 curriculum video packages to U.S. educators;
  • Conducted over 1500 outreach activities;
  • Reached over 12,000 students through in-house briefings and other programs;
  • Conducted 23 student town meetings at high schools and colleges;
  • Conducted over 600 Washington and regional events for Department's speakers program; and
  • Delivered over 70 presentations at State and National Governmental conferences.
Target Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.
Rating On Target
Impact Public outreach programs raised awareness and public understanding of current foreign policy issues, increased public engagement in the policy process, and provided U.S. citizens opportunities to exchange views with Department of State officials who formulate and implement policy. Conducted throughout the U.S., these programs encourage ongoing interest, involvement and dialogue.

OUTPUT INDICATOR

Indicator #3: Increase in hits on the Department's Domestic Website

FY Results History 2000 N/A
2001 4.8 million hits per month.
2002 4 million hits per month.
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results 5 million hits per month.
Target 4.5 million hits per month.
Rating On Target
Impact Information dissemination by electronic means continues to be successful, evidenced by gradually increasing "hits" counts. The audience for the 2009-2017.state.gov site is the American public. U.S. hits continue to be in the wide majority (70% vs. about 30% for international hits), so we are successfully reaching our target, while making a notable impact on foreign audiences as well.

 

Secretary Powell's remarks at the Foreign Press Center on U.S. Foreign Policy after the U.N. General Assembly. � AP Photo by Ron Edmonds.

 

Photo showing Secretary of State Colin Powell remarking on U.S. Foreign Policy after the U.N. General Assembly.

 

I/P #5: HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS

Increase efforts to publish Foreign Relations volumes within the 30-year time period required by law, support the policy process with adequate research studies, and bring a historical context to "broader, deeper, and younger" outreach activities.

OUTPUT INDICATOR

Indicator #4: Number of Historical, Research, and Educational Publications

FY Results History 2000 N/A
2001 N/A
2002 N/A
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results Baseline: Published six (6) Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) volumes.
Target Publish four (4) FRUS volumes.
Rating Above Target
Impact The six volumes published in FY 2003 included two that were unique and had a significant public impact. One, a path-breaking volume on the intellectual foundations of the Nixon administration's foreign policy, received high praise from the Department's congressionally mandated Advisory Committee on Historical Diplomatic Documentation. The other, an unprecedented retrospective volume on the 1954 coup in Guatemala, even had an impact beyond our borders. It led to considerable public discussion and praise for the Department and the USG, within both the United States and Guatemala, and had a positive impact on both bilateral relations and the public perception of the USG overseas. In addition, over a dozen policy-related research studies were prepared for Department principals, which provided essential historical background for their use in dealing with current foreign policy issues, such as the Iraq war and terrorism.