Countries/Jurisdictions of Primary Concern - Cyprus

Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Report

Since 1974, Cyprus has been divided between a government-controlled area, comprising the southern two-thirds of the island and a northern third administered by Turkish Cypriots. The Republic of Cyprus government is the only internationally recognized authority; in practice, it does not exercise effective control over the area the Turkish Cypriots declared independent in 1983. The United States does not recognize the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus,” nor does any country other than Turkey.

Cyprus is a regional financial center, and until its financial crisis of 2013, had a robust financial services industry and a significant number of nonresident businesses. Cyprus’ preferential tax regime; double tax treaties with 55 countries, including the United States, several European countries, and former Soviet republics; well-developed and modern legal, accounting, and banking systems; a sophisticated telecommunications infrastructure; and EU membership all contributed to Cyprus’ rise as a regional business hub. As of October 31, 2015, there were 252,890 companies registered in Cyprus, many of which belong to nonresidents, particularly Russians. Many of these nonresidents moved their money from banks to investment companies. All companies registered in Cyprus must disclose their ultimate beneficial owners to the authorities.

Experts agree that the greatest money laundering vulnerability in Cyprus is primarily due to international criminal networks that use Cyprus as an intermediary. Examples of specific domestic criminal threats include advance fee fraud, counterfeit pharmaceuticals, and transferring illicit proceeds from identity theft. There is no significant black market for smuggled goods in Cyprus. Police and customs officials report that what little black market trade exists is usually related to small-scale transactions, typically involving fake clothing, pirated CDs/DVDs, and cigarettes moved across the UN-patrolled buffer zone dividing the island.

The Republic of Cyprus government is on track to successfully complete a three-year economic bail-out program with the “Troika” (IMF, European Commission, and the European Central Bank) by the end of March 2016. The Troika program has helped the government address fiscal imbalances, although restructuring of the banking sector remains a work in progress. Capital controls were fully lifted in April 2015, two years after their introduction, and confidence is returning in the local banking sector. After almost four years of recession, the Cypriot economy started growing again in 2015, recording growth that could reach 1.5 percent, although unemployment remains high at approximately 15 percent.

Cyprus has two free trade zones (FTZs) located in the main seaports of Limassol and Larnaca, which are used for transit trade. These areas enjoy a special status and are considered to be outside normal EU customs territory. Consequently, non-EU goods placed in FTZs are not subject to any import duties, value added tax, or excise tax. FTZs are governed under the provisions of relevant EU and domestic legislation. The Ministry of Finance Department of Customs has jurisdiction over both areas and can impose restrictions or prohibitions on certain activities, depending on the nature of the goods.

For additional information focusing on terrorist financing, please refer to the Department of State’s Country Reports on Terrorism, which can be found at: //2009-2017.state.gov/j/ct/rls/crt/

Do FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONs engage in currency transactions related to international narcotics trafficking that include significant amounts of U.S. currency; currency derived from illegal sales in the U.S.; or illegal drug sales that otherwise significantly affect the U.S.: NO

criminalizATION OF money laundering:

“All serious crimes” approach or “list” approach to predicate crimes: All serious crimes

Are legal persons covered: criminally: YES civilly: YES

Know-your-customer (KYC) rules:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs: Foreign: YES Domestic: YES

KYC covered entities: Banks, cooperative credit institutions, securities and insurance firms, money transfer businesses, payment and electronic money institutions, trust and company service providers, auditors, tax advisors, accountants, real estate agents, dealers in precious stones and gems, and attorneys

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 813: January 1 – November 16, 2015

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not available

STR covered entities: Banking institutions, cooperative credit institutions, and securities and insurance firms; payment institutions, including money transfer businesses and e-money institutions; trust and company service providers; auditors, tax advisors, accountants, and real estate agents; dealers in precious stones and gems; attorneys; and any person who in the course of his profession, business, or employment knows or reasonably suspects that another person is engaged in money laundering or terrorist financing activities

money laundering criminal Prosecutions/convictions:

Prosecutions: 15: January 1 – November 11, 2015

Convictions: 24: January 1 – November 11, 2015

Records exchange mechanism:

With U.S.: MLAT: YES Other mechanism: YES

With other governments/jurisdictions: YES

Cyprus is a member of the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL), a FATF-style regional body. Its most recent mutual evaluation report can be found at: http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/moneyval/Countries/Cyprus_en.asp

Enforcement and implementation issues and comments:

The Republic of Cyprus continues its efforts to counter criticisms of lax banking rules by strengthening its AML regime and resources. In 2015, despite the government-wide hiring freeze and caps on government spending, the Unit for Combating Money Laundering (MOKAS), the Republic of Cyprus’s financial intelligence unit (FIU), hired two new staff members and continued to improve its analytical capacity. Cyprus has adopted and implemented new provisions addressing enhanced due diligence for politically exposed persons (PEPs) and inclusion of tax evasion as a money laundering offense.

Throughout 2015, Cypriot authorities continued to implement the requirements of the AML action plan that include enhanced legislation and systems for identifying, tracing, freezing, seizing, and forfeiting narcotics-related assets and assets derived from other serious crimes.

Cyprus has no provisions allowing non-conviction-based forfeiture of assets, except in the case of dead or absconded persons. MOKAS can freeze assets of indicted entities but will not actually forfeit them until after conviction. Cyprus has engaged in bilateral and multilateral negotiations with other governments to enhance its asset tracking and seizure system.

Post financial crisis, Cypriot authorities and the public are paying increased attention to the need for transparency and avoiding questionable business practices. Cyprus should focus on enforcement and education, and maintain best business practices, particularly in light of plans to deregulate and establish a gaming industry.

Area Administered by Turkish Cypriots

The Turkish Cypriot-administered area lacks the legal and institutional framework necessary to provide effective protection against the risks of money laundering. There are 22 banks in the area administered by Turkish Cypriots; seven are branches of international banks. The “Ministry of Economy” drafts banking “regulations” and the “central bank” supervises the implementation of the “regulations.”

The offshore banking sector remains a concern to law enforcement. It consists of seven banks regulated by the “central bank” and 332 companies regulated by the “Ministry of the Economy.” Offshore banks are not authorized to conduct business with residents in the north and may not deal in cash. Turkish Cypriots only permit banks licensed by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development-member nations or Turkey to operate an offshore branch in the north.

As of November 2015, there are 28 casinos in the Turkish Cypriot-administered area - four in Nicosia, three in Famagusta, three in Iskele, and 18 in Kyrenia. These remain essentially unregulated because of shortfalls in available enforcement and investigative resources.

There are press reports of smuggling of tobacco, alcohol, meat, and fresh produce across the buffer zone. Additionally, intellectual property rights violations are a concern; a legislative framework is lacking; and pirated materials, such as sunglasses, clothing, shoes, and DVDs/CDs are freely available for sale.

Do FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONs engage in currency transactions related to international narcotics trafficking that include significant amounts of U.S. currency; currency derived from illegal sales in the U.S.; or illegal drug sales that otherwise significantly affect the U.S.: NO

criminalizATION OF money laundering:

“All serious crimes” approach or “list” approach to predicate crimes: All serious crimes

Are legal persons covered: criminally: YES civilly: YES

Know-your-customer (KYC) rules:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs: Foreign: NO Domestic: NO

KYC covered entities: Banks, cooperative credit societies, finance companies, leasing/factoring companies, portfolio management firms, investment firms, jewelers, foreign exchange bureaus, real estate agents, retailers of games of chance, lottery authority, accountants, insurance firms, cargo firms, antique dealers, auto dealers, and lawyers

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 664: January 1 – November 13, 2015

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not available

STR covered entities: Banks, cooperative credit societies, finance companies, leasing/factoring companies, portfolio management firms, investment firms, jewelers, foreign exchange bureaus, real estate agents, retailers of games of chance, lottery authority, accountants, insurance firms, cargo firms, antique dealers, auto dealers, and lawyers

money laundering criminal Prosecutions/convictions:

Prosecutions: 9: January 1 – November 13, 2015

Convictions: 3: January 1 – November 13, 2015

Records exchange mechanism:

With U.S.: MLAT: NO Other mechanism: NO

With other governments/jurisdictions: YES

The area administered by Turkish Cypriots is not part of any FATF-Style Regional Body (FSRB) and thus is not subject to normal peer evaluations.

Enforcement and implementation issues and comments:

While progress has been made in recent years with the passage of “laws” better regulating the onshore and offshore banking sectors and casinos, these “statutes” are not sufficiently enforced to prevent money laundering. The resources dedicated to enforcing the administered area’s “AML Law” fall short of the present need. Experts agree the ongoing shortage of law enforcement resources and expertise leaves the casino and gaming/entertainment sector essentially unregulated, and, therefore, especially vulnerable to money laundering abuse. The unregulated money lenders and currency exchange houses are also areas of concern for “law enforcement.” The EU provides technical assistance to the Turkish Cypriots to combat money laundering more effectively because of the area’s money laundering and terrorist finance risks.

With international assistance, the Turkish Cypriots drafted new AML “legislation” in 2014 that incorporates UNSCRs 1267 and 1373 and extends to casinos and exchange houses. The “legislation” was referred to “parliament” in June 2014 for discussion and is still pending approval.

Banks and other designated entities are required to submit suspicious transaction reports (STRs) to the “FIU.” Following receipt, the “FIU” forwards STRs to the five-member “Anti-Money Laundering Committee,” which decides whether to refer suspicious cases to the “attorney general’s office,” and then, if necessary, to the “police” for further investigation. The five-member committee is composed of representatives of the “Ministry of Economy,” “Money and Exchange Bureau,” “central bank,” “police,” and “customs.”

The Turkish Cypriot authorities should continue their efforts to strengthen the “FIU” and more fully resource and implement a strong licensing and regulatory environment to prevent money laundering and the financing of terrorism. This is particularly true for casinos and money exchange houses. Turkish Cypriot authorities should enforce the cross-border currency declaration requirements and take steps to enhance the expertise of members of the enforcement, regulatory, and financial communities with an objective of better regulatory guidance, more efficient STR reporting, better analysis of reports, and enhanced use of legal tools available for prosecution.