Countries/Jurisdictions of Primary Concern - Austria

Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Report

Austria is a major regional financial center. Austrian banking groups control significant shares of the banking markets in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe. Money laundering occurs to some extent within the Austrian banking system as well as in non-bank financial institutions and businesses. Money laundered by organized crime groups derives primarily from fraud, smuggling, corruption, narcotics trafficking, and trafficking in persons. Theft, drug trafficking, and fraud are the main predicate crimes in Austria according to conviction and investigation statistics. Austria is not a frequent offshore destination for illicit funds and has no free trade zones.

Casinos and gambling are legal in Austria, but in some provinces slot machines are prohibited, and there are efforts underway to limit certain aspects of sport betting. The laws regulating casinos include AML/CFT provisions. There are migrant workers in Austria who send money home via all available channels, including regular bank transfers and money transmitters, but also informal and illegal remittance systems. No information is available to what extent informal systems are used.

For additional information focusing on terrorist financing, please refer to the Department of State’s Country Reports on Terrorism, which can be found at: //2009-2017.state.gov/j/ct/rls/crt/

DO FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS ENGAGE IN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS RELATED TO INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING THAT INCLUDE SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF US CURRENCY; CURRENCY DERIVED FROM ILLEGAL SALES IN THE U.S.; OR ILLEGAL DRUG SALES THAT OTHERWISE SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE U.S.: NO

CRIMINALIZATION OF MONEY LAUNDERING:

“All serious crimes” approach or “list” approach to predicate crimes: Combination approach

Are legal persons covered: criminally: YES civilly: NO

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs: Foreign: YES Domestic: NO

KYC covered entities: Banks and credit institutions; domestic financial institutions authorized to conduct financial leasing, safe custody, portfolio and capital consulting, credit reporting, and mergers and acquisitions services; brokers and securities firms; money transmitters and exchanges; insurance companies and intermediaries; casinos; all goods dealers; auctioneers and real estate agents; lawyers, notaries, certified public accountants, and auditors

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 1,673 in 2014

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not applicable

STR covered entities: Banks and credit institutions; domestic financial institutions authorized to conduct financial leasing, safe custody, portfolio and capital consulting, credit reporting, and mergers and acquisitions services; brokers and securities firms; money transmitters and exchanges; insurance companies and intermediaries; casinos; all goods dealers; auctioneers and real estate agents; lawyers, notaries, certified public accountants, auditors, and customs officials

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: 426 in 2014

Convictions: 46 in 2014

RECORDS EXCHANGE MECHANISM:

With U.S.: MLAT: YES Other mechanism: YES

With other governments/jurisdictions: YES

Austria is a member of the FATF. Its most recent mutual evaluation can be found at: http://www.fatf-gafi.org/topics/mutualevaluations/documents/mutualevaluationofaustria.html

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

Austria has in place comprehensive AML/CFT legislation. In recent years, the government reformed the financial intelligence unit operational procedures and supervisory framework; developed and published regulations and guidelines; and organized a series of outreach events and training to increase the level of awareness of AML/CFT.

Austria has an “all serious crimes” approach to the criminalization of money laundering plus a list of predicate offenses that do not fall under the domestic definition of serious crimes, but which Austria includes to comply with international legal obligations and standards.

Austrian banks have strict legal requirements regarding secrecy. However, the law stipulates that secrecy regulations do not apply with respect to banks’ obligation to report suspicious transactions in connection with money laundering or terrorism financing, or with respect to ongoing criminal court proceedings. Any amendment of these secrecy regulations requires a two-thirds majority approval in Parliament. In 2014, Austria accepted a long-delayed EU law to curtail bank secrecy and tax evasion. The law requires the EU member states to automatically exchange information on accounts held by their citizens abroad. Austria said it needed more time to comply with the agreement and create a new reporting system. Austria was given until 2018 to comply.

The Austrian Financial Market Authority (FMA) regularly updates a regulation issued January 1, 2012, which mandates banks and insurance companies apply additional special due diligence when doing business with designated countries. In 2014 the regulation stipulated increased scrutiny for foreign “politically exposed persons (PEPs),” such as government members, politicians, and prominent public officials.

After a decline in the previous year, the number of filed suspicious transaction reports (STRs), and particularly prosecutions and convictions, rose significantly in 2014. Austrian authorities maintain that the improved legal framework and training contributed to this development. The number of AML convictions in relation to the amount of prosecutions remains quite low.