The Financial Action Task Force and FATF-Style Regional Bodies

Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Report

The Financial Action Task Force

The Financial Action Task Force (FATF), created in 1989, is an inter-governmental body whose purpose is the development and promotion of national and international policies to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. The FATF currently has 36 members, comprising 34 member countries and territories and two regional organizations, as follows: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, The Kingdom of the Netherlands (includes the Netherlands, Aruba, Curacao, and Sint Maarten), New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, South Korea, Russian Federation, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, the United States, the European Commission, and the Gulf Cooperation Council.

There are also nine FATF-style regional bodies that, in conjunction with the FATF, constitute an affiliated global network to combat money laundering and the financing of terrorism.

The Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering (APG)

The Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering (APG) was established in 1997. The APG has 41 members: Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Burma, Cambodia, Canada, China, Cook Islands, Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, New Zealand, Niue, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor Leste, Tonga, United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam.

The Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF)

The Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF) was established in 1992. CFATF has 27 members: Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Curacao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Sint Maarten, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands, and Venezuela.

The Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL)

The Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL) was established in 1997 under the acronym PC-R-EV. MONEYVAL is comprised of 30 permanent members and two temporary, rotating FATF members. The permanent members are Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, the Holy See, Hungary, Israel, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, and Ukraine. The rotating FATF members are currently France and Italy. By virtue of Resolution CM/Res(2012)6, the UK Crown Dependencies of Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man formally participate in the mutual evaluation procedures of MONEYVAL, as does the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar via Resolution CM/Res(2015)26.

The Eastern and Southern Africa Anti-Money Laundering Group (ESAAMLG)

The Eastern and Southern Africa Anti-Money Laundering Group (ESAAMLG) was established in 1999. Eighteen countries comprise its membership: Angola, Botswana, Comoros, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

The Eurasian Group on Combating Money Laundering and Financing of Terrorism (EAG)

The Eurasian Group on Combating Money Laundering and Financing of Terrorism (EAG) was established in 2004. The EAG has nine members: Belarus, China, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

The Financial Action Task Force of Latin America (GAFILAT)

The Financial Action Task Force of Latin America (GAFILAT), formerly the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering in South America (GAFISUD), was established in 2000. The 16 GAFILAT members are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay.

Inter Governmental Action Group against Money Laundering in West Africa (GIABA)

The Inter-Governmental Action Group against Money Laundering in West Africa (GIABA) was established in 1999. GIABA consists of 16 countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cote d’Ivoire, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo.

The Middle East and North Africa Financial Action Task Force (MENAFATF)

The Middle East and North Africa Financial Action Task Force (MENAFATF) was established in 2004. MENAFATF has 18 members: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Authority, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

The Task Force on Money Laundering in Central Africa (GABAC)

The Task Force on Money Laundering in Central Africa (GABAC), established in 2000, is a body of the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC). GABAC became an observer organization of the FATF in February 2012, and since then worked with the FATF to meet the requirement of a FATF-Style Regional Body. In October 2015, the FATF recognized GABAC as an FSRB and admitted it as an associate member. GABAC’s associate membership has extended the reach of the FATF global network into Central Africa. GABAC currently has 10 members, comprising six member countries and four regional representatives, as follows: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, the Governor of the Banks of the States of Central Africa, the president of the CEMAC Commission, the president of the Committee of Police Chiefs of Central Africa. and the Secretary General of the Banking Commission of Central Africa.